30. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.



The Employment Guide Charleston June 30 - July 6, 2008
The Employment Guide Charleston June 30 - July 6, 2008



Some of this week's Employers who are hiring:


  • Perdue Farms

  • Charleston's Best Home Service

  • Job Crafters

  • Life Sera

  • Securitas

  • Andersen Services

Don't forget to visit Charleston.EmploymentGuide.com for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.


30. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.



The Employment Guide Atlanta June 30 - July 6
The Employment Guide Atlanta June 30 - July 6



Some of the companies hiring and educational opportunities for this week:




  • Carmax
  • Interactive College of Technology
  • American Professional Institute
  • The Center of Industry and Technology
  • Atlantic CDL Training Center
  • Laurus Technical College
  • Westwood College
  • Labor Force Staffing Services
  • Georgia Security Academy
  • Guardsmark LLC
  • Florida Rock & Tank Lines
  • Daly's Truck Driving School
  • Western Express, Inc.
  • Tulalip Resort Casino
  • Venturi Staffing
  • Staffmark
  • Comcast
  • Ozburn-Hessey Logistics
  • Sunbelt Rentals
  • Adecco
  • Schwan's Home Service
  • The Ocean Corporation
  • Toyota Forklifts of Atlanta
  • Kaylim Career Institute
  • Bauder College


Don't forget to visit Atlanta.EmploymentGuide.com for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.


27. June 2008 | Show Originial

Lately I've been kinda obsessed about crossword puzzles. It's weird, I know, but I just love trying to solve them (even though 75% of the time I can't finish it.) Plus on vacation I got to spend a lot of time with my grandmother who does the crossword everyday from the daily paper. Weird as it may be, I thought it'd be fun to have a job search crossword puzzle! Infact, I found one! (Thanks Illinois Valley Community College) Job searching can be stressful and frustrating at times. But sometimes you just have to have fun with it.
So click the link below to test your skills on the job search.


Job Search Review Crossword Puzzle

Enjoy!

- Rosie Reilman, Photo by sarae

26. June 2008 | Show Originial
I read a really interesting post on Brazen Careerist by Beth Harris today. The post, Today's Job Market Makes Me Question My Career Choice, I think pretty much sums up a lot of sentiments people have when looking at the job market. While certain industries are having a harder time, there are industries that can't seem to fill positions at the same rate they are opening.

Every other day there are stories and reports of job losses, and “natural” attrition in the industry has grown 10 fold. It is really unavoidable, because ultimately it is all about profit, and no company in this market will retain employees that it doesn’t really need. Downsizing happens everywhere. But the human toll, and the revelation of the contradictions of the market, bear noticing.
Healthcare, particularly nursing and government agencies like the Border Patrol are two of the industries that she talks about as being in real need of people.

She brings up a good point. When searching for a career do you consider what the job market is like when deciding what you want to do? Most of us when we're younger, we don't usually consider the economy or pay scale when we dream about what we want to be in we grow up. I know several times I've looked at a few of my nursing friends and seen all the benefits and different things they've been able to do because they are in a career that is in high demand.
Then again, according to an NPR story, new graduates hitting the job market don't have much to worry about, it's still a good year to be graduating and hittin the job market. Employers project an increase in new graduate hires this year as opposed to last year. The report also suggests a book called What is that Job and How the Hell Do I Get It by David J. Rosen.
The book sounds especially good for high school seniors (and maybe even new graduates) who aren't sure what they want to do as far as a career goes. It picks out 50 cool and interesting jobs, what exactly the job responsibilities are and how you go about getting hired.
In my opinion, I think it's good to keep your dreams and goals. Sometimes you have to get creative and find a less obvious way of doing your 'dream job'. Things like the economy might hold you back for awhile but it's important to remember that the job market always changes. Sometimes, you can find happiness without having a specific career path and if for some reason you can't have a 'dream job' you can still find ways to live your dream.
So should you consider economy? Sure. But that doesn't mean that everyone should quit their jobs, change their majors or go back to school to get their nursing degree. (Unless of course that's what you'd really be happy doing.) Just take some time and get creative. Seek out and ask people who are in the career you want about th work they are doing - what they like and don't like, what they do during their work hours, etc. Get a little creative about your job search and in picking your career.
- Rosie Reilman, Photos by patrick dodson and adtmarin

25. June 2008 | Show Originial
Social Media in the Health Care Industry


Since the launch of HealthCareerWeb a few months back, I have been digging and searching to find the gap that exists between Social Media and health care recruiting. In my quest I ran across Phil Bauman, a Social Media advocate who is also a Registered Nurse. This is 1 piece of a 3-part discussion we had about Social Media and the Healthcare industry. The other 2 parts can be found at the Orlando JobSpot and the Tampa JobSpot.

In this session we are looking at ways that Job Boards, Social Communities and other 3rd party groups can connect with Health Care professionals and institutions.

For our sales representatives, Health Care marks a new journey. It asks for new jargon, new contacts and new conversations. There is a need for great nurses and overall healthcare positions in this country. For the Employment Guide, HealthCareerWeb was a natural progression. Breaking into their world is an exciting challenge and I asked Phil how to best break the walls down and start communicating and conversing with Health Care HR professionals. His responses:

-Social Networks could include links to facilities or offer invitations to participate in the "conversation". Approaching the CEO or CNO of a community or large city hospital for instance and inviting them to Guest Blog or guest converse would be a great way to spark interest.
-Traditional Job Boards aren't always the optimal recruiting strategy. However, following the model of LinkedIn (the Answers feature) could be a great way for candidates to demonstrate their knowledge and professional curiosity while stimulating hospitals to get online in order to recruit the best talent.
-I think there should be more A-list Bloggers who could survey their audience about the general community needs of social media in healthcare. Everybody is affected by healthcare, including participants of blogs. Even bloggers who never touch healthcare as a topic could write great posts to pique reader's interest.
-Nurses and doctors aught to learn how to blog, and learn the basic tools of social media.
These are great access points to get involved with not only the HR and recruitment aspect of HR but also health care in general. Luckily, HealthCareerWeb was built with this type of community and growth in mind.

Phil mentions LinkedIn and their answers section. With HealthCareerWeb we have implemented a Forum that gives candidates and recruiters alike the ability to ask and answer questions about anything that is deemed important to them. For the job seeker, this gives them the ability to further brand themselves beyond the resume. For the recruiter it opens the door up to see what kind of personality a job seeker has by the way they answer certain questions.

I also agree that getting more bloggers and social media types involved will help improve communication between the 2 worlds. By allowing them to take baby steps into social media via guest blogging, interviews on ?A? list blogs, widget integration and walk-throughs of sites like HealthCareerWeb will help them understand their importance.

As a job seeker, as long as you are putting out relevant information, you are only helping yourself get positioned for a better opportunity. The more places you can interact with other professionals and recruiters, the more likely that your talents will be seen and acknowledged.

I hope you enjoyed this piece. Please leave any questions or opinions in the comments and be sure to read the other 2 parts of the series at the Orlando JobSpot and the Tampa JobSpot.

(Greg Rollett is the Internet Marketing and Social Media Specialist from the Orlnado Employment Guide. Read his blog here and follow his job updates and more on Twitter.)
25. June 2008 | Show Originial
Social Media and Health Carephoto by rosefirerising

Since the launch of HealthCareerWeb a few months back, I have been digging and searching to find the gap that exists between Social Media and health care recruiting. In my quest I ran across Phil Bauman, a Social Media advocate who is also a Registered Nurse. This is 1 piece of a 3-part discussion we had about Social Media and the Healthcare industry. The other 2 parts can be found at the Orlando JobSpot and the Employment Guide Spot Blog.

In this session we are looking at ways that the Health Care industry has embraced open communication via Social Media and some hindrances that are stopping Health Care HR professionals from using these tools.

Being a registered nurse, Phil Bauman has the opportunity to offer hands on information as to what is available to him on his job. (Disclaimer: Phil works at just one health care company and may not necessarily have the access to tools that others do.) We are looking at on the job tools and not personal profiles on Social Networking sites. His thoughts on the technology available on the job as well as tips that can be implemented on the job are as follows;

  • Most online tools that I have seen seem to be based on the employment and recruiting models of the 20th century. I think we need to move away from the resume-interview-cog model to a personal/professional branding model. A well-crafted and interesting blog can improve a person's awareness of their own skills and provide a deeper understanding of a candidate's background.
  • Likewise, a hospital blog that allows its employees to blog is a great way to show prospective candidates "Hey, this hospital is WAY ahead of the game. I should check them out."
  • Word of mouth is the marketing (and recruiting) of the future. It always was the best way to go, but in light of the Long Tail advanced by online social media, it's important that facilities intelligently investigate, invest and maintain the right kinds of social media. Again, a LinkedIn version for healthcare could make sense.
  • Hospitals could even use social media for their staffing, their staff scheduling and job promotion.

I can attest to the recruiting end that Social Media is starting to make an impact on the way professionals are brought into organizations. With the rise in job boards and the ease of use in mass applying, HR professionals need to find ways to better position themselves apart from their competitors as well as passive job seekers. Using Social Media as a tool to filter through candidates, proactively search through great employees and showcase their institute is only the beginning.

Like Phil said, blogging can lead to an increase in brand awareness and recognition. This goes a lot further than recruiting great talent. If your great talent can increase the visibility of your company through blogging and Social Media you can increase business and your ROI starts to increase. Both are win-wins in today’s economic state.

So, why aren’t HR professional in the Health Care industry using these tools such as blogging, video, Social Networking and the like? Phil goes on to state:

  • There are nurses who use social media. But in my experience, many nurses are unaware of the tools out there. Perhaps because Main Stream Media paints a caricature of blogs and social media. Also nurses get so busy with providing healthcare and don't sit at desks with internet access at work all day that it's easy for the world to pass them by. Facilities should encourage, not discourage social media.
  • HR professionals in health care might also feel that healh care professionals aren't online. A solution would be for HR professionals to develop educational materials to their employees and prospective employees. A web page devoted to Social Media Education could go a long way for adoption. The process has to be active, not passive.
  • HR professionals need to understand the value to empolyees, patients and the facility itself in using social media. Education is the key.

The second point is a strong one. If there are no other health care professionals networking online then essentially you will have no one to talk with. That’s the theory at least. Well, it’s a good thing theories are meant to be tested and changed.

Why not be the first to market? Why not be the innovative leader? Putting yourself and these organizations out to the web will start a conversation, whether you know it or not. People will find you via the network, word-of-mouth or through search engines. Web 2.0 is all about conversations. Allowing your peers, clients and other professionals to converse with you is a great thing to have.

On HealthCareerWeb we have made this an easy option for health care companies to say YES to. When you have an account with HCW, you have the ability to connect with other professionals, job seekers and industry players as well as post events and forums. The tools have been built, now we need you to join the conversation!

So, where is your institution? Are they talking online or still trying to figure this Social Media thing out? Please leave your comments, answers and questions in the comments. If you have other needs or questions, please send an email to and we can set you up with a consultation on Social Media and HealthCareerWeb.

The other 2 articles in the series can be found here:

Orlando JobSpot

Employment Guide Spot Blog

-Greg Rollett


25. June 2008 | Show Originial
It's not surprising to me that some employers - particularly those in the financial realm - do a credit check on their prospective employees. But a report from ABC says that more employers are using credit check to determine responsibility and even job performance.

The article talks about how the practice is still somewhat disputed but some argue that if you have bills higher than your salary that this will distract from job performance. Whether or not you agree or disagree with this practice, the fact is you may have to deal with it. So here's some of the advice offered by Tory Johnson of ABC:

Read the fine print. Under federal law, prospective employees must give permission for employers to conduct background checks, including credit checks, so none of this happens behind our backs. Yet some 80 percent of Americans, according to a Visa survey, don't realize that credit history can be used in pre-employment screening. Whenever you sign an employment application, read the fine print. Most of the time, you're signing a consent and disclosure clause that grants your permission to the employer and its designated third party vendor(s) to conduct a background check. Be aware of what exactly you're agreeing to upfront.


Bad credit, now what? If you have poor credit, it doesn't automatically mean you're unemployable. You should focus on three steps so you don't lose out on
positions. Check your credit report. Even if you're not actively job searching, everyone should know what's in their credit report. Under federal law, you have the right to receive a free copy of your credit report once every 12 months from each of the three nationwide consumer reporting companies. Don't bury your head; if you have problems with your credit or you find mistakes on the report, address them immediately with creditors and the reporting company. This will come in very handy should you find yourself looking for work.


Ask the employer's policy. Then when it comes to job searching, avoid oluntarily discussing credit history during the interview process. There's no need to knock yourself out of the running prematurely. When you receive an offer that's contingent on a background check, ask directly, "I'm thrilled at the prospect of working here. What is your policy on background checks? I'd like to know what specific screenings you use and the general timeframe for that process." At this point, they've said they want you, so you're in a good position to ask such a question with relative ease. Most employers will gladly walk you through their process.


Speak up with confidence. If an employer says the background screening includes a credit check — and you've seen the negative activity on your credit report — then you should consider speaking up. You can say, "I'd like to tell you what in advance you're likely to find on my personal credit report. Please allow me the opportunity to explain it, too." It's important to have a solid rationale. Maybe you hit a challenge because of an unexpected layoff, a divorce, a medical necessity, or a problem with your mortgage. Maybe there are mistakes on your report that you're working to fix.

Read the full article: How Bad Credit Can Affect Job Prospects, ABC News


The article provides pretty solid advice in dealing with a uncomfortable topic. I think what is important is to remain rational and be confident in your skills in the job you're interviewing for. Knowing your credit score and how to approach it (if you have negative activity) will really help you in being prepared in an interview, which helps in your confidence level and can really effect the employer's decision.



- Rosie Reilman, Photo by The Consumerist
23. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.





The Employment Guide Atlanta June 23-29
The Employment Guide Atlanta June 23-29

Some of the companies hiring and educational opportunities for this week:


  • CPS Security
  • Iverson Business School
  • Gwinnett College
  • Georgia Security Academy
  • TMD Temporaries
  • Lincoln College of Technology
  • Covenant Transport
  • Central Truck Driving Academy
  • Checker Cab
  • Towne Air Freight
  • Brinks
  • Dominos Pizza
  • Tulalip Resort Casino
  • Doubletree
  • Norred & Associates
  • Lift Temp
  • Aviation Institute
  • U.S. Park Police

Don't forget to visit Atlanta.EmploymentGuide.com for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.
23. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.


The Employment Guide Columbia June 23-29
The Employment Guide Columbia June 23-29



Some of this week's advertisers are:
  • ECPI College of Technology
  • Andersen Services
  • Centura College
  • AAA
  • Teleperformance
  • The Cleaning Authority
  • Gaz-Bah Mini Shops
  • Personnel Management
Don't forget to visit http://Columbia.EmploymentGuide.com/ for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.
23. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.


The Employment Guide Charleston June 23-29, 2008
The Employment Guide Charleston June 23-29, 2008


Some of this week's Employers who are hiring:
  • Guardsmark Security
  • Wal-Mart
  • ECPI College of Technology
  • Charleston's Best Home Service
  • Personnel Management, Inc.
  • Life Sera
  • Snelling Staffing Services
  • Jiffy Lube
  • Securitas
  • Job Crafters
Don't forget to visit Charleston.EmploymentGuide.com for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.
19. June 2008 | Show Originial
In conjunction to our Employment Guide to Careers and the help of the Department of Labor Career Guide, I'll be doing a blog post series on different careers that are popular on www.EmploymentGuide.com. This hopefully will give you insight as to what a particular job will entail, the types of qualifications and skills that you'll need to get the job and any other relevant information. Please feel free to comment or suggestions as to what you'd like to see in this series.

Mechanical and Skilled Trade Jobs: HVAC Technicians and Installers

On the Job
Heating and air-conditioning systems control the temperature, humidity, and the total air quality in residential, commercial, industrial, and other buildings. Refrigeration systems make it possible to store and transport food, medicine, and other perishable items. Heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers—also called technicians—install, maintain, and repair such systems. Because heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration systems often are referred to as HVACR systems, these workers also may be called HVACR technicians.


Heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration systems consist of many mechanical, electrical, and electronic components, such as motors, compressors, pumps, fans, ducts, pipes, thermostats, and switches. In central forced air heating systems, for example, a furnace heats air, which is then distributed via a system of metal or fiberglass ducts. Technicians must be able to maintain, diagnose, and correct problems throughout the entire system. To do this, they adjust system controls to recommended settings and test the performance of the system using special tools and test equipment.


Technicians often specialize in either installation or maintenance and repair, although they are trained to do both. They also may specialize in doing heating work or air-conditioning or refrigeration work. Some specialize in one type of equipment—for example, hydronics (water-based heating systems), solar panels, or commercial refrigeration. Some technicians also sell service contracts to their clients. Service contracts provide for regular maintenance of the heating and cooling systems and they help to reduce the seasonal fluctuations of this type of work.


Technicians follow blueprints or other specifications to install oil, gas, electric, solid-fuel, and multiple-fuel heating systems and air-conditioning systems. After putting the equipment in place, they install fuel and water supply lines, air ducts and vents, pumps, and other components. They may connect electrical wiring and controls and check the unit for proper operation. To ensure the proper functioning of the system, furnace installers often use combustion test equipment, such as carbon dioxide testers, carbon monoxide testers, combustion analyzers, and oxygen testers. These tests ensure that the system will operate safely and at peak efficiency.


After a furnace or air-conditioning unit has been installed, technicians often perform routine maintenance and repair work to keep the systems operating efficiently. They may adjust burners and blowers and check for leaks. If the system is not operating properly, they check the thermostat, burner nozzles, controls or other parts to diagnose and correct the problem.

Benefits and Salary
Median hourly wage-and-salary earnings of heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers were $18.11 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $14.12 and $23.32 an hour. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $11.38, and the top 10 percent earned more than $28.57.
Heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers enjoy a variety of employer-sponsored benefits. In addition to typical benefits such as health insurance and pension plans, some employers pay for work-related training and provide uniforms, company vans, and tools.

Daily Routine & Work Environment
Heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers work in homes, retail establishments, hospitals, office buildings, and factories—anywhere there is climate-control equipment that needs to be installed, repaired, or serviced. They may be assigned to specific job sites at the beginning of each day or may be dispatched to a variety of locations if they are making service calls.


The majority of mechanics and installers work at least a 40-hour week. During peak seasons, they often work overtime or irregular hours. Maintenance workers, including those who provide maintenance services under contract, often work evening or weekend shifts and are on call. Most employers try to provide a full workweek year-round by scheduling both installation and maintenance work, and many manufacturers and contractors now provide or even require year-round service contracts. In most shops that service both heating and air-conditioning equipment, employment is stable throughout the year.


Experience & Required Education
Because of the increasing sophistication of heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration systems, employers prefer to hire those who have completed technical school training or a formal apprenticeship. Some mechanics and installers, however, still learn the trade informally on the job.


Applicants for apprenticeships must have a high school diploma or equivalent. Math and reading skills are essential. After completing an apprenticeship program, technicians are considered skilled trades workers and capable of working alone. These programs are also a pathway to certification and, in some cases, college credits.


Those who acquire their skills on the job usually begin by assisting experienced technicians. They may begin by performing simple tasks such as carrying materials, insulating refrigerant lines, or cleaning furnaces. In time, they move on to more difficult tasks, such as cutting and soldering pipes and sheet metal and checking electrical and electronic circuits.

Read more about Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers


Search for HVAC Installer or Technician Jobs

Check out Education and Training to work in HVAC

Photo by beau-foto
17. June 2008 | Show Originial

Gas prices have been on the rise. The Employment Guide has decided to do something to help. We're going to give away a $50 gas card every week to a randomly drawn name. The contest starts July 1st.


To Enter

Use the Chat Box to the right in the sidebar.

You'll need to type in and enter your Name, Telephone Number and Email address. (If it says we're offline, that's ok. We'll still get your entry.)

Only enter once and you have to be 16 years or older to win.

If you try and enter more than once, it's in vain because we're not going to count multiple entries.


Your contact information will only be used to contact you if you're the winner. So you can get a job on www.EmploymentGuide.com and now we'll help you get there each week. Any questions you can send to ncjobs@www.employmentguide.com but we're only accepting entries through the Chat box.
photo by A Siegel

17. June 2008 | Show Originial

Gas prices have been on the rise. The Employment Guide has decided to do something to help. We're going to give away a $50 gas card every week to a randomly drawn name. The contest starts July 1st.


To Enter

Use the Chat Box to the right in the sidebar.

You'll need to type in and enter your Name, Telephone Number and Email address. (If it says we're offline, that's ok. We'll still get your entry.)

Only enter once and you have to be 16 years or older to win.

If you try and enter more than once, it's in vain because we're not going to count multiple entries.


Your contact information will only be used to contact you if you're the winner. So you can get a job on www.EmploymentGuide.com and now we'll help you get there each week. Any questions you can send to ncjobs@www.employmentguide.com but we're only accepting entries through the Chat box.
photo by A Siegel

16. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.




The Employment Guide Atlanta Edition June 16 - 22
The Employment Guide Atlanta Edition June 16 - 22


Some of the companies hiring and educational opportunities for this week:


  • CarMax Auto Finance
  • Iverson Business School
  • Gwinnett College
  • Thomas Healthcare Institute of Atlanta
  • TMD Temporaries
  • NeuroTrials Research Inc.
  • Brown Mackie College
  • Stevens Transport
  • Central Truck Driving Academy
  • Dominion Distribution
  • Western Express
  • Star Transportation
  • Brinks
  • Gategourmet
  • Georgia Security Academy
  • CPS Security
  • Georgia Dome
  • Ryla Teleservices
  • Personnel Management
  • TruCheck
  • DeKalb Technicial College
  • Aviation Institute
  • U.S. Park Police

Don't forget to visit Atlanta.EmploymentGuide.com for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.
16. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.

The Employment Guide Columbia Edition June 16 - 22
The Employment Guide Columbia Edition June 16 - 22


Some of this week's advertisers are:
  • AAA Carolinas
  • Centra College
  • Burger King
  • Teleperformance
  • Burke's Outlet
  • Andersen Services
  • First Cash Pawn
  • Teleperformance
  • Bi-Lo
Don't forget to visit http://Columbia.EmploymentGuide.com/ for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.
13. June 2008 | Show Originial
Disconnection. The feeling of not being in the know. Not sitting at the "cool" table at lunch and knowing what the "big shots" know.

These are problems that those looking for jobs often feel. There is a shallow feeling that you do not know what is going on behind closed doors.

HealthCareerWeb has opened that communication up. It is the attempt to connect a person to a posting and life into an empty position. With Social Networking, you get an open, 2-way communication stream. You are free to poke around. You are free to message and ask questions.

The best part, is that the people on Social Networks want to connect with you. They are on these sites to find like-minded individuals who share the same profession, passions, interests and friends/associates. Being a part of this community puts you in the know. It gives you a front row seat to watch the lunch tables, hear their thoughts and comment back.

Phil Bauman, a Registered Nurse enthralled with Social Media defines the term as:
"an ever-evolving interactive connection among people"

With HealthCareerWeb, the tools have been built for you to suceed and get involved in the inside of the job seeking process. Talk to other employees at the local hospital. Ask questions to recruiters. Look at pictures and events. All these things lead us back to improving the quality of our careers and occupation.

So, if you are a healthcare professional, take 5-10 minutes out of your day and create a profile. Browse the site for other like minded health care professionals in the greater Tampa area. See what the hospitals are saying. Liten to what other job seekers are saying. Take advantage of what is already built for you.

Happy hunting Tampa and have a great weekend!

-Greg Rollett
11. June 2008 | Show Originial
Having a positive outlook and impact on those around you can help you more than you'd think. No one likes to hear someone be negative or complain all the time. If you think about it you're probably more likely to help out someone who helps you. So if you can set yourself up to have a good postive impact on those around you, not only will it will help support a good strong professional and personal network, but also probably make you a better person in general. Some of these below are excellent things to keep in mind when interviewing as well. So Fast Company's Blog had a good list of 15 tips for creating a positive impact on those around you. I thought I'd share. Feel free to visit and read the full post here. The world could be a little nicer place if people tried to practice these a little more frequently.
  1. Assume every person you meet is important, and treat him or her as such.
  2. Shake hands strongly and firmly and, even better, say something positive while doing so.
  3. Keep an open body posture, with your hands away from your face while speaking.
  4. Stand up straight and tall, but not rigidly.
  5. When speaking to a group, speak conversationally. Do not read from a script.
  6. Take the time to remember people's names, and use them in conversation.
  7. Look at the color of people's eyes. They will notice the extra attention you're giving them.
  8. Sincerely compliment people freely.
  9. Notice and acknowledge other people's strengths and accomplishments.
  10. Use pauses while you speak to create emphasis.
  11. Take care of your outside appearance; look your best.
  12. Smile, ideally a little bit longer than the person you're looking at.
  13. Hear the emotions in people's words, and respond to them.
  14. Use positive body language. Maintain eye contact, briefly touch people on their upper arm, and moving around while you speak.
  15. Be genuinely interested in those around you. Ask them their opinions, inquire about their life and interests, listen and don't interrupt.

- Rosie Reilman


09. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.



The Employment Guide Columbia June 9-15
The Employment Guide Columbia June 9-15




Some of this week's advertisers are:

  • AAA Carolinas
  • Centra College
  • Burger King
  • Teleperformance
  • Asphalt Materials Company
  • Covenant Transport
  • First Cash Pawn
  • American Republic Insurance Company
  • Bi-Lo
Don't forget to visit http://Columbia.EmploymentGuide.com/ for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.
09. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.





The Employment Guide Atlanta June 9-15
The Employment Guide Atlanta June 9-15



Some of the companies hiring and educational opportunities for this week:


  • CarMax Auto Finance
  • Iverson Business School
  • Gwinnett College
  • Thomas Healthcare Institute of Atlanta
  • TMD Temporaries
  • NeuroTrials Research Inc.
  • Brown Mackie College
  • Stevens Transport
  • Central Truck Driving Academy
  • Dominion Distribution
  • Western Express
  • Star Transportation
  • Brinks
  • Gategourmet
  • Georgia Security Academy
  • CPS Security
  • Georgia Dome
  • Ryla Teleservices
  • Personnel Management
  • TruCheck
  • DeKalb Technicial College
  • Aviation Institute
  • U.S. Park Police

Don't forget to visit Atlanta.EmploymentGuide.com for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.
04. June 2008 | Show Originial
The most popular season for internships has already started, but that doesn't mean its too late for you to get involved in a program. Whether your first choices passed you by or you put off applying till now, there are still internships to be had for those who are willing to look. Larger companies with more structured and established programs have already ceased to accept applications, so focus your search on smaller and midsize employers.

Start your last minute search as quickly as possible by contacting your campus career center. Many companies give these offices notice about available internship programs in hopes of having students steered their way, so they may have a list of positions that are still available handy. Professors also often know what is going on locally in their field and maybe able to help a student they have faith in locate a last minute internship.

If neither of these yield any promising options, then try tapping into your social network. Maybe your parents, their acquaintances, or even your friend's parents know about a company that is still looking for interns. Don't be ashamed of utilizing those contacts. Getting a job is often about knowing the right people and having access to such information.

Another option is to call companies that you would be interested in working for directly and ask if they have any intern slots open. There is always the chance that they didn't receive as may applications as they were expecting or that an intern dropped out of the program. In some cases companies that do regularly run internship programs will create an informal position for a student with good references who shows a lot of interest in working for them.

Since many students prefer to participate in internship programs during the summer, the competition for positions with the most prestigious companies is already high. If you are unable to secure a coveted slot with a company you're interested it, don't sweat it. Many employers are now offering internship programs during the fall and spring semesters. Although this may require you to take a semester off or increase your workload, the end results are certainly worth it. You stand to gain a considerable amount of workplace experience and the possibility of a job after graduation.
04. June 2008 | Show Originial
College graduates seem to have it all at their finger tips. They are fresh out of a 16-year long battle with their teachers and studies, and have a document of paper saying they've made it. They're focused, they're aggressive, and they're ready to take on the world. In fact, job seekers with degrees are more likely to get more money out of their positions because of their degrees. So why is it that the average college student might have a hard time finding a job or career day one out of their frat pad?

Unfortunately, the one thing that most college graduates are lacking is experience in their field. Just like I did, and most people I know, the average college student might have a part-time position as a barista or working for the college library - not doing part-time paralegal work for their local law office. This makes it that much more difficult for an employer to hire someone fresh out of college.

There are a few ways you can help avoid this situation once you've graduated.

First, it might not be the best job, but it's a job. Start by getting your foot in the door with an organization you really like, or an industry you're passionate about. For instance, say you have a degree in Non-Profit Management, but can't seem to get hired in any management positions because of your lack of experience. What else is available? Perhaps there is an assistant position available, or a receptionist, or even something in the mail-room. So you'll have to spend a year or so doing a little bit of grunt work. Some of the most successful people in the world have started at the very bottom and moved their way up the ladder. Putting in that time and really getting to know your industry is without a doubt one of the most irreplaceable assets you can bring to the table with any application and resume.

Maybe you're not ready for a full-time job right out of college, many students aren't. Thankfully, you can still work on getting experience in your field through internships. Many organizations and companies offer part-time and full-time internships that will allow you to get experience in one or several departments, giving you that much more fuel to back your degree with when you apply for your first full-time gig. A friend of mine, fresh out of college, applied for a photography internship with a well-known railroad and transportation company and has ended up being able to use that experience with the company to land a job in their digital archiving department - a department created specifically for his talents.

The most important thing to remember is to try, and when that fails (because it might), try again. It might sound cheesy, but persistence really will get you far. There's a reason every graduate receives "Oh, the Places You'll Go" by Dr. Seuss as a graduation present. It's true.

For more help with your job search, you can visit www.EmploymentGuide.com. Search through our thousands of jobs, and then apply online.
04. June 2008 | Show Originial

This morning as I was going through my RSS feeds and reading up on all the latest from the blogs that I subscribe to I saw this post: 10 Career Lessons from Country Music. It's a really entertaining and surprisingly helpful article using the words of George Strait, Alan Jackson, Brooks and Dunn and some others to help your career. So you can learn more from country music than just good on-stage safety! But seriously, it's a good read and find thanks to Dennis.


Here's the 10 Tips - you'll have to read the article to see how country music explains them:
  1. Set and manage expectations
  2. Don’t trust your memory alone
  3. Remember that your electronic creations hang around
  4. Use the right medium to communicate
  5. Think before you speak
  6. Keep the customer informed
  7. Tell customers when a problem is fixed
  8. Have a positive attitude when you communicate
  9. Don’t forget that lost customers are difficult to get back
  10. Do what’s right for the customer


- Rosie Reilman, Photo courtesy of CMT.


02. June 2008 | Show Originial
Click on the image below to view a copy of this week's edition of The Employment Guide.

The Employment Guide Columbia June 2-8
The Employment Guide Columbia June 2-8


Some of this week's advertisers are:
  • ECPI College of Technology
  • Burger King
  • Bi-Lo
  • The Cleaning Authority
  • AAA Carolinas
  • American Republic Insurance Company
  • Navy Reserve
  • Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College
Don't forget to visit http://Columbia.EmploymentGuide.com/ for more job listings and to learn more about the employers you see in this week's edition.
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