31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.

Our current employment system is based on the assumptions that workers need protection, are victims, are not able to work or make decisions for themselves. We need to wake up to the fact that the workers we need and want to hire are making choices every day about who to work for and why. They are opting for employers that provide training, ongoing development, personal growth opportunities, and flexibility.

The concept of a talent shortage is based on projections that assume tomorrow will look like today.


31. July 2008 | Show Originial
If you don't get ERE Daily and are in the recruiting industry, you really need to. Today there is an article by Kevin Wheeler called The Myth of a Talent Shortage. I like his post because it's not all doom and gloom. He talks about the changes in the workforce and some of the challenges in different industries that recruiters face.

Sure, thousands of baby boomers are poised to retire over the next decade or two and, yes, there are somewhat fewer young folks behind them; but is that really going to be a problem? And will the number of boomers who choose to retire reach the predicted numbers?

Studies I have seen indicate that boomers will most likely defer retirement for some time because they have not saved enough to make retirement possible or because they remain healthy and want to continue working.


You can check out WiserWorker and it's blog for proof of that. Definitely check out the rest of Wheeler's article for more on this topic.