24. January 2011 | Show Originial

There are many goofy holidays that may fall on any given day of the week. As you may guess, not all of these holidays are agreed upon by the “holiday experts.” Sometimes agreeing on the date is the problem; other times the type of celebration becomes debatable. Occasionally the holiday is thought to not even exist at all. There is one holiday that falls on January 27th however, that is not up for debate. That holiday, as I am SURE you may have guessed, is Punch the Clock Day. 

 

Punch the Clock Day to some may mean getting overly aggressive with their snooze button, but surprisingly that is not what the day celebrates. Punch the Clock Day celebrates those employees who work tirelessly and punch their time cards every day without any appreciation. This day is dedicated to those underappreciated employees who work under careless, ungracious bosses. Some ways you may know you are underappreciated include:

  • Your boss consistently mixes up your name with another employee
  • Your co-worker has the same title and pay as you, but completes half the amount of work you do
  • The ideas you give to your boss apparently turn to dust as soon as they reach his/her ears
  • Your boss gives you so much work, that he/she clearly believes you to be superhuman

 

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it may be time to take a stand. Punch the Clock Day is meant for you to put your foot down and demand a celebration with your favorite ice cream cake and balloons with your name on it. Furthermore, and more importantly, it is a day to demand some overdue respect from your management. To some who may be hesitant to make such demands, maybe it is time to take a look at other employment options. After all, you have the work ethic and ability- why waste your time at a company that doesn’t appreciate you? 

 

You need to find a job that gives back to you as much as you put into it. A great way to find these types of jobs is through attending free job fairs that bring the jobs to you. However, occasionally too many people in one place, all asking similar questions, can make many people dizzy. If you are one of those people, another great resource to use is free job alerts, which are job opportunities brought to you via email.

 

Stop talking about making a positive difference for yourself, and start taking steps to make that difference. This year, don’t choose to ignore the true meaning of January 27th, choose to make Punch the Clock Day your own!


20. January 2011 | Show Originial

As a part of our 2011 job fair series, “I Am Able”, www.EmploymentGuide.com will be hosting a job fair in the Greater Cleveland area on March 25, 2011. This event will be hosted at the IX Center from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. If you were not at our last Cleveland job fair, you missed out on the opportunity of meeting recruiters from over 70 companies. You will not want to miss this event so make sure you mark this event in your calendar.

Job seekers of all ages are invited. We also recommend that you pre-register online now and save yourself some time at the door come March. You will also be happy to know that this event will be free of admission. Since first impressions are always important, we urge that you dress professionally and bring copies of your resume. Also follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook and we will give you updates on what companies will be attending our event. For more information, you can contact us at . We look forward to seeing you there!


19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



19. January 2011 | Show Originial
The 10th annual Pittsburgh Diversity Employment Expo Job Fair series will begin this year on March 15th at Consol Energy Center from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. Interest is already high among local Pittsburgh employers and over 60 companies are expected to be on hand.

Produced by the Pittsburgh office of www.EmploymentGuide.com and co-sponsored by The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, AARP Foundation WorkSearch and the Allegheny County Department of Veteran's Affairs, featuring career opportunities from Consol Energy, Inc, this event is open to the general public and free for all job seekers.

Positions being offered will be in health care, oil/gas, manufacturing, banking/finance, retail, military, hospitality and much more. Pre-registration for job seekers is not required but doing so will allow faster entrance at the door by-passing the registration table!

Job Seekers may pre-register by clicking here.

Pittsburgh area employers are invited to find out more about how they can attend by emailing .

A complete company list will be publicized shortly and updated throughout the event date.



12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



Read more:
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current jobless rate is going to require the net addition of at least 135,000 jobs month after month.

That's not happening — yet. But economists are revising their GDP growth projections upward, and if the conventional wisdom holds, that has to result in stronger job creation at some point quite soon. (Employment growth tends to follow GDP growth with a lag.) Companies are already sitting on mountains of cash because they increased productivity through layoffs and other efficiencies. They have the money to hire, but they need to see increasing sales to justify it. There's some evidence that consumers are finally opening their wallets. Christmas sales were strong. Given the stimulus coursing through the economy from the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, the tax-cut extension and a 2-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax, the retail therapy should continue into the new year.



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http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2040964-1,00.html
12. January 2011 | Show Originial
From Time.com
By Bill Saporito 

Kent Niederhofer can't find enough mechanical engineers to work for him — in southeastern Michigan. You know, where Detroit is, with its 13.3% unemployment rate. Niederhofer is president of the American branch of Ricardo, an engineering consultancy that designs the power trains of some of the coolest stuff around: Bugatti sports cars, huge wind turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles. "We are doing rocket science every day," says Niederhofer. "It's just not on rockets." So Ricardo got a little desperate, renting a billboard to place a help-wanted ad that featured a picture of a sexy-looking sports car, the tagline "Why you became an engineer" and a Web address for job seekers. He calls it engineer porn.

General Electric is also trying to poach some Motown engineers to staff its expansion at Appliance Park, in Louisville, Ky., and three other locations where it is establishing "centers of excellence" in refrigeration technologies. The company is in the middle of a $1 billion investment in its appliance sector that will create 1,300 jobs at all levels over the next four years. GE has repatriated — insourced, if you will — a refrigerator-manufacturing line from South Korea (thanks in part to a new union deal and a weaker dollar that makes U.S. labor more competitive) even as it waits for the housing market to rebound enough to restore demand for fridges. "We think it's going to be a slow crawl back over the next several years, which, for us, is why we are investing now," says James Campbell, CEO of GE Appliances & Lighting.

A Turning Point, Maybe

Flexible, outwardly focused companies such as Ricardo, GE and Deloitte are the main force behind an optimistic and underplayed fact: last September, the U.S. economy finally stopped bleeding jobs. And now job creation may be at a crucial turning point. The ADP National Employment Report recorded a surprising 297,000-job jump in private-sector employment in December. Manufacturing activity is up, retail sales are strong, and overall GDP growth is on track to be a healthy 3% this year. Inflation is still muted, and stocks are on a roll. It all bodes well for the Obama Administration's efforts to mitigate the 9%-to-10% unemployment rate that has hung for 19 months like a deadweight around the neck of the economy, not to mention the national psyche.

The Great Recession didn't merely cause cyclical job losses. It created an unemployment chasm. More jobs were lost in the 2007-09 recession, which officially ended in June 2009, than in the previous four recessions combined, says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight. "It's a very deep hole that we are climbing out of. We lost something close to 8 million jobs. That's why it's going to take a long time — 2015 — to get to [an unemployment rate of] 6%." Indeed, the rate could even rise again, as people who left the labor pool — and thus don't count as unemployed — start to look for work again.

That 6% figure refers to what economists call full employment, meaning that people who want to work can find it (give or take time lost to layoffs or telling the boss to shove it). Knocking any kind of dent in the current joble